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Coordinated Human Services Transportation

Download the Plan

Download the EMSID (5310) Program of Projects

Download the JARC (5307) Program of Projects

In August of 2005, legislation was signed for the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) which requires a locally developed, coordinated public transit-human services transportation plan (CHSTP). The purpose of a plan is to improve transportation services for persons with disabilities, older adults, and individuals with lower incomes by ensuring that communities coordinate transportation resources provided through multiple federal programs. Coordination will enhance transportation access, minimize duplication of services, and facilitate the most appropriate and cost-effective transportation possible with available resources.

The plan has been developed through the coordinating partnership of Nashville MTA, RTA, Nashville MPO, TDOT, Greater Nashville Regional Council (GNRC) Neighborhoods Resource Center, The Center for Independent Living, Council on Aging of Greater Nashville, The TMA Group, and In Shuttle Transportation. The plan applies to the urbanized areas within Davidson, Rutherford, Sumner, Williamson and Wilson counties and will also provide for coordination with Springfield, Tennessee in Robertson County and Spring Hill in Maury County.

The Plan
The Nashville Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) is the designated recipient for the Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) and Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities (EMSID) funds for the Nashville Urbanized Area. As the designated recipient for JARC and EMSID funds, MTA is required to have a coordinated human services transportation plan (CHSTP) on file with FTA. It is currently on file with FTA. MTA has contracted with RTA to develop, coordinate, and implement the plan in order to provide greater regional coordination, outreach and management efforts.

RTA and MTA will continue to work closely with other transportation provider agencies, consumers, advocates, human service agencies and others to assess available transportation services, identify transportation gaps, and seek innovative strategies and solutions to better service the regional coordination efforts.

In summary, the CHSTP process indicates a need for the following:

  • Lower cost on demand, accessible service for lower income mobility impaired

  • More on-demand service for seniors and disabled individuals

  • More door to door and door through door services for seniors and disabled individuals

  • More fixed route deviated services and connections

  • More service on the weekends and on demand

  • Better information and communications about existing transportation services

  • Better coordination to provide service for diverse needs (i.e. transportation to jobs, health care, child care and other services available in that area).

JARC Program History
The Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program has had a dramatic impact on the lives of thousands of welfare recipients and low-income families, helping individuals successfully transition from welfare to work and reach needed employment support services such as childcare and job training activities. JARC was established as part of TEA-21 to address the unique transportation challenges faced by welfare recipients and low-income persons seeking to get and keep jobs. With many new entry-level jobs located in suburban areas, low-income and/or welfare recipients have found it difficult to access these jobs from their inner city, urban and rural neighborhoods on a daily basis. Further, many entry-level jobs require working late at night or on weekends when conventional transit services in many communities are either reduced or non-existent. Finally, many employment-related trips are complex for low-income persons, often involving multiple destinations, including reaching childcare facilities and other services as part of the work trip.

JARC Program Goal
SAFETEA-LU has been developed through the coordinating partnership of the Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) and the goal of the JARC program is to improve access to transportation services to employment and employment related activities for welfare recipients and eligible low-income individuals and to transport residents of urbanized areas and non-urbanized areas to suburban employment opportunities. Toward this goal, the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) provides financial assistance for transportation services planned, designed, and carried out to meet the transportation needs of eligible low-income individuals, and of reverse commuters regardless of income. The program requires coordination of Federally-assisted programs and services in order to make the most efficient use of Federal resources.

JARC Program Measures
Under the Government Performance Results Act (GPRA), FTA is required by law to "establish performance goals to define the level of performance" and to also "establish performance indicators to be used in measuring relevant outputs, service levels, and outcomes" for each of its programs. The performance measures described here are designed to fulfill FTA's obligations under this Act. These measures will be used at a program level, and will not be used to assess individual grants.

FTA will be capturing overall program measures to be used with the GPRA and the Performance Assessment Rating Tool process for the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB). FTA will conduct independent evaluations of the program focused on specific data elements in order to better understand the implementation strategies and related outcomes associated with the program. The following indicators are targeted to capture overarching program information as part of the Annual Report that each grantee submits to FTA. Specific reporting requirements for recipients can be found in Chapter VI.

The two measures established for the JARC Program are:

  • Actual or estimated number of jobs that can be accessed as a result of geographic or temporal coverage of JARC projects implemented in the current reporting year.

  • Actual or estimated number of rides (as measured by one-way trips) provided as a result of the JARC projects implemented in the current reporting year.

EMSID Program History
The Section 5310 program was established in 1975 as a discretionary capital assistance program. In cases where public transit was unavailable, insufficient, or inappropriate, the program awarded grants to private nonprofit organizations to serve the transportation needs of seniors and persons with disabilities.

Congress enacted The Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21) on July 6, 2012, and the law became effective on October 1, 2012. MAP-21 repealed the New Freedom program (49 U.S.C. 5317) and merged the New Freedom program into the Section 5310 program. As a result of this merger of programs, activities eligible under the New Freedom program are now eligible under Section 5310, and, consistent with Section 5317, funds are apportioned among large urbanized areas, small urbanized areas, and rural areas, instead of only to states, as the law previously provided. The apportionment is based on the population of seniors and individuals with disabilities in large UZAs, small UZAs, and rural areas. MAP-21 authorized $254,800,000 for FY 2013 and $258,300,000 for FY 2014, which is an increase over the SAFETEA-LU authorized amount of $226,000,000 for FY 2012 for the Section 5310 and Section 5317 programs combined.

In addition to the types of projects eligible under the traditional Section 5310 program and the former New Freedom program, a new eligible activity is public transportation projects that improve access to fixed-route service and decrease reliance by individuals with disabilities on complementary paratransit. MAP-21 requires that not less than 55 percent of a recipient's Section 5310 funds be available for capital projects that are “traditional” Section 5310 projects. A recipient may use more of its Section 5310 funds for these capital projects, but may not use less.

EMSID Program Measures
Under the Government Performance Results Act (GPRA), FTA is required by law to “establish performance goals to define the level of performance” and to also “establish performance indicators to be used in measuring relevant outputs, service levels, and outcomes” for each of its programs. The performance measures described here are designed to fulfill FTA's obligations under this Act. These measures will be used at a program level, and will not be used to assess individual grants.

FTA will be capturing overall program measures to be used with the GPRA and the Performance Assessment Rating Tool process for the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. FTA will conduct independent evaluations of the program focused on specific data elements in order to better understand the implementation strategies and related outcomes associated with the program.

The following indicators are targeted to capture overarching program information as part of the annual report that each state and designated recipient submits to FTA. The state and designated recipient should submit both quantitative and qualitative information as available on each of the following measures. Designated recipients are required to fulfill management and oversight in regards to sub recipient agencies.

EMSID Program Goals
The primary goals of this process are to address unfulfilled transportation needs and to facilitate transportation services to seniors and individuals with disabilities. To meet the goal of addressing unmet needs, the Section 5310 program provides financial assistance for capital and operating projects that are public transportation projects in which they are planned, designed and carried out to meet the special needs of seniors and individuals with disabilities when the public transportation is insufficient, inappropriate or unavailable and projects that exceed the requirement of the Americans with Disabilities Act by improving access to fixed route service and decrease reliance of sole paratransit alternatives. Nashville MTA seeks to enhance regional transportation coordination efforts in order to build partnerships among federal, state, regional, local private and public sectors so that improvements can be made regarding transportation need delivery.


Regional Transportation Authority of Middle Tennessee
430 Myatt Drive ~ Nashville, TN 37115     phone: (615) 862-8833     fax: (615) 862-6208     email: rta@nashville.gov
In association with TDOT (Tennessee Department of Transportation), FTA (Federal Transit Administration), and MPO (Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization)
RTA is a Clean Air Partner of Middle Tennessee and a Clean Air Partner of Williamson County
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